What does it look like to “turn on” a gene?
What does it look like to “turn on” a gene?

Only recently have scientists directly witnessed this most pivotal of events in biology, thanks to new technology that allows them to observe the process in living cells. It’s teaching them a lot. || Knowable

Rescued from a war zone, an Iraqi chemist finds a future in pharma
Rescued from a war zone, an Iraqi chemist finds a future in pharma

A scholarship led Firas Jumaah to graduate studies at Lund University, which then saved him and his family from Islamic State militants || Chemical & Engineering News

Lighting design for better health and well being
Lighting design for better health and well being

Cleverly designed artificial lighting can sidestep negative effects on the body’s circadian clock, and might even bring health benefits. || Nature Outlook

Stump-grown Christmas Tress are the Gift That Keeps On Giving
Stump-grown Christmas Tress are the Gift That Keeps On Giving

Using the sustainable and ancient method of coppicing, evergreen Christmas trees can be regrown indefinitely || Smithsonian.com

The dating game: When food goes bad
The dating game: When food goes bad

New technologies to predict spoilage time could slash the massive waste between farm and fork || Knowable

Do "workplace wellness" programs work?
Do "workplace wellness" programs work?

It depends on what you mean by a wellness program. Offerings by companies are all over the map, but most are skimpy and scattershot. It takes more than that to boost employees’ health or a company’s bottom line. || Knowable

Decoding insects' chemical cues
Decoding insects' chemical cues

Chemical ecologist Shannon Olsson and neuroscientist Karin Nordström employ 3-D printing and virtual reality to answer pressing questions about pollinators || Chemical & Engineering News

The road to recovery – how life can survive in a radioactive environment
The road to recovery – how life can survive in a radioactive environment

The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and Bikini Atoll are still devoid of humans. But without the threat of our presence, could wildlife thrive in a radioactive environment? || BBC Focus

Interviewing for Career-Spanning Profiles
Interviewing for Career-Spanning Profiles

Profiles of scientists in the golden years of their careers take the measure of a life in science and reveal the motivations that have guided their work. Here’s how to ask questions to elicit the details as well as the big ideas || The Open Notebook

What to watch for when analyzing mouse behavior
What to watch for when analyzing mouse behavior

Tests for unusual behavior in mice are notoriously prone to operator error. Many scientists conduct or interpret them incorrectly, and the problems then taint the literature. || Spectrum News

Can We End Animal Testing?
Can We End Animal Testing?

In theory, innovative techniques using stem cells, computer modelling and 3D-printing could reduce the number of animals used in medical research. But in practice, the picture is more complicated. || BBC Focus

Modeling Autism
Modeling Autism

Autism researchers are using gene editing to move from mice to monkeys and thereby improve model validity. But old challenges remain, and new concerns await. || Lab Animal

Microbes in the medical bag
Microbes in the medical bag

Genetically engineered gut bacteria hold promise for safe, targeted therapies || Knowable

Getting to know the gut microbiome
Getting to know the gut microbiome

Researchers are finally getting the tools to understand just how the microbial communities in and on our bodies affect health. But there are many mysteries left to solve — and many technological challenges. || Knowable

Tiny temperature sensors
Tiny temperature sensors

New nanothermometry techniques give cell biologists ways to measure temperature at the subcellular level || Chemical & Engineering News

What the rat brain tells us about yours
What the rat brain tells us about yours

The evolution of animal models for drugs to treat depression and other psychiatric conditions || Nautilus

Fermented food as microbial world
Fermented food as microbial world

Researchers use cheese, kombucha, and kimchi to study the ecology of relationships within microbial communities || PNAS Front Matter

The Shape-Shifting Army Inside Your Cells
The Shape-Shifting Army Inside Your Cells

Proteins work like rigid keys to activate cellular functions — or so everyone thought. Scientists are discovering a huge number of proteins that shape-shift to do their work, upending a century-old maxim of biology. || Quanta

What will it take to find a human pheromone?
What will it take to find a human pheromone?

Despite decades of research into chemical communication, scientists are no closer to determining whether a human pheromone exists || Chemical & Engineering News

Repurposing Story Ideas  For Multiple Venues
Repurposing Story Ideas For Multiple Venues

Spinning off stories from a work-in-progress ranks among freelancers’ top underused skill sets. Here’s how you can make it happen. || The Open Notebook

The Neuroscience of Poverty
The Neuroscience of Poverty

Neuroscientists are investigating whether growing up poor shapes children’s brains in ways that might also shape their lives. || PNAS Front Matter

Why Fake It?
Why Fake It?

How 'sham' brain surgery could be killing off valuable therapies for Parkinson's disease. || Nature

What does it look like to “turn on” a gene?
Rescued from a war zone, an Iraqi chemist finds a future in pharma
Lighting design for better health and well being
Stump-grown Christmas Tress are the Gift That Keeps On Giving
The dating game: When food goes bad
Do "workplace wellness" programs work?
Decoding insects' chemical cues
The road to recovery – how life can survive in a radioactive environment
Interviewing for Career-Spanning Profiles
What to watch for when analyzing mouse behavior
Can We End Animal Testing?
Modeling Autism
Microbes in the medical bag
Getting to know the gut microbiome
Tiny temperature sensors
What the rat brain tells us about yours
Fermented food as microbial world
The Shape-Shifting Army Inside Your Cells
What will it take to find a human pheromone?
Repurposing Story Ideas  For Multiple Venues
The Neuroscience of Poverty
Why Fake It?
What does it look like to “turn on” a gene?

Only recently have scientists directly witnessed this most pivotal of events in biology, thanks to new technology that allows them to observe the process in living cells. It’s teaching them a lot. || Knowable

Rescued from a war zone, an Iraqi chemist finds a future in pharma

A scholarship led Firas Jumaah to graduate studies at Lund University, which then saved him and his family from Islamic State militants || Chemical & Engineering News

Lighting design for better health and well being

Cleverly designed artificial lighting can sidestep negative effects on the body’s circadian clock, and might even bring health benefits. || Nature Outlook

Stump-grown Christmas Tress are the Gift That Keeps On Giving

Using the sustainable and ancient method of coppicing, evergreen Christmas trees can be regrown indefinitely || Smithsonian.com

The dating game: When food goes bad

New technologies to predict spoilage time could slash the massive waste between farm and fork || Knowable

Do "workplace wellness" programs work?

It depends on what you mean by a wellness program. Offerings by companies are all over the map, but most are skimpy and scattershot. It takes more than that to boost employees’ health or a company’s bottom line. || Knowable

Decoding insects' chemical cues

Chemical ecologist Shannon Olsson and neuroscientist Karin Nordström employ 3-D printing and virtual reality to answer pressing questions about pollinators || Chemical & Engineering News

The road to recovery – how life can survive in a radioactive environment

The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and Bikini Atoll are still devoid of humans. But without the threat of our presence, could wildlife thrive in a radioactive environment? || BBC Focus

Interviewing for Career-Spanning Profiles

Profiles of scientists in the golden years of their careers take the measure of a life in science and reveal the motivations that have guided their work. Here’s how to ask questions to elicit the details as well as the big ideas || The Open Notebook

What to watch for when analyzing mouse behavior

Tests for unusual behavior in mice are notoriously prone to operator error. Many scientists conduct or interpret them incorrectly, and the problems then taint the literature. || Spectrum News

Can We End Animal Testing?

In theory, innovative techniques using stem cells, computer modelling and 3D-printing could reduce the number of animals used in medical research. But in practice, the picture is more complicated. || BBC Focus

Modeling Autism

Autism researchers are using gene editing to move from mice to monkeys and thereby improve model validity. But old challenges remain, and new concerns await. || Lab Animal

Microbes in the medical bag

Genetically engineered gut bacteria hold promise for safe, targeted therapies || Knowable

Getting to know the gut microbiome

Researchers are finally getting the tools to understand just how the microbial communities in and on our bodies affect health. But there are many mysteries left to solve — and many technological challenges. || Knowable

Tiny temperature sensors

New nanothermometry techniques give cell biologists ways to measure temperature at the subcellular level || Chemical & Engineering News

What the rat brain tells us about yours

The evolution of animal models for drugs to treat depression and other psychiatric conditions || Nautilus

Fermented food as microbial world

Researchers use cheese, kombucha, and kimchi to study the ecology of relationships within microbial communities || PNAS Front Matter

The Shape-Shifting Army Inside Your Cells

Proteins work like rigid keys to activate cellular functions — or so everyone thought. Scientists are discovering a huge number of proteins that shape-shift to do their work, upending a century-old maxim of biology. || Quanta

What will it take to find a human pheromone?

Despite decades of research into chemical communication, scientists are no closer to determining whether a human pheromone exists || Chemical & Engineering News

Repurposing Story Ideas For Multiple Venues

Spinning off stories from a work-in-progress ranks among freelancers’ top underused skill sets. Here’s how you can make it happen. || The Open Notebook

The Neuroscience of Poverty

Neuroscientists are investigating whether growing up poor shapes children’s brains in ways that might also shape their lives. || PNAS Front Matter

Why Fake It?

How 'sham' brain surgery could be killing off valuable therapies for Parkinson's disease. || Nature

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